UNITED STATES: HOLIDAYS: FOURTH OF JULY: FOOD HISTORY: Article

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UNITED STATES: HOLIDAYS: FOURTH OF JULY: FOOD HISTORY: Article

David P. Dillard
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Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2009 15:57:58 EDT
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Subject: UNITED STATES:  HOLIDAYS:  FOURTH OF JULY:  FOOD HISTORY:  Article


UNITED STATES:  HOLIDAYS:  FOURTH OF JULY:
FOOD HISTORY:  Article


Source:   Grilling - History of Fourth of July Fare - AOL Food

<http://food.aol.com/grilling/fourth-of-july?icid=main|
htmlws-main|dl3|link3|http%3A%2F%
2Ffood.aol.com%2Fgrilling%2Ffourth-of-july>


Tiny URL = http://tinyurl.com/nk7hgb



Feast on the Fourth

Food, family, friends -- what better way is there to spend
a festive Independence Day? We've gathered our favorite
recipes for cookout classics, including some contributions
by grilling guru Steven Raichlen.

<snip>

Get the Recipes


Good Old Grilled Chicken
Hamburgers with Herb Butter
Stuffed Hot Dogs
New Red Potato Salad
North Carolina Pulled Pork
North Carolina Coleslaw

Steven Raichlen's Grilled Corn
Real Cornbread
Strawberry Shortcake
Grandma Ople's Apple Pie
Malt Shop Chocolate Ice Cream
Uptown Smores
Get All the Ultimate Fourth of July Recipes


Early Americans drank frequently, and the arrival of the
Fourth provided them with a conveniently patriotic excuse
to drink even more. In 18th century Charleston, bowls of
stiff eggnog were fixtures of Independence Day parties --
many of which were well underway before noon. One
especially raucous Philadelphia celebration, recounted in
historian Len Travers' "Celebrating the Fourth," threatened
to spill over into July 5 as attendees, eager to keep filling
their punch cups, offered endless toasts to the young country's
military heroes.

Food and drink signifying freedom -- whether from sobriety
or a hot summer kitchen -- have always played an integral
role in July Fourth celebrations. While hamburgers and
hot dogs are relatively recent additions to the holiday's
culinary canon, a free-spirited, summer-loving streak runs
through the history of Independence Day cuisine.

<snip>

Ice cream was, of course, a luxury in the pre-electric age,
when dessert connoisseurs lacked not just functional coolers
to prevent their treats from melting, but the means to make
their own ice. Until John Gorrie, a Florida physician who
believed he could successfully fight yellow fever if he had
an adequate supply of ice, invented an ice maker in 1848,
ice-cream lovers were stuck harvesting ice from frozen
northern lakes and keeping it packed in sawdust until
the summer.

Even after ice cream became a more pedestrian indulgence,
it remained the go-to July Fourth snack. In 1938, when New
York State Commissioner of Agriculture Charles Baldwin
lectured housewives on summer food safety, he briefly drifted
into a reverie that had nothing to do with botulism. Sweet,
cool milk and homemade sherbert were his "happiest
memories of the Fourth of July of childhood," he told the
crowd, urging New Yorkers to send away for his office's
pamphlet of "snappy milk drink" recipes.

<snip>

Watermelon, which annually made its first appearance in
northern markets right before the holiday, was another popular
July Fourth treat.

Back when locavorism wasn't optional, Independence Day
menus were largely dictated by availability. Not surprisingly,
regionalism reigned, with Southerners feasting on barbecue
and brunswick stew, Midwesterners enjoying fried chicken
and potato salad and New Englanders devouring salmon.*

"Custom decrees that salmon and peas must be served at
Fourth of July dinners," a New York Times writer chronicling
the Northeastern tradition wrote in 1941. "In earlier times,
clans reunited on the Fourth, and meals were of gargantuan
proportions. A fish weighing upward of 15 pounds was stuffed,
skewered, garnished with bacon and put in a hot oven, there
to bake long hours until it turned a golden brown."

<snip>

Unlike the anointed foods of Thanksgiving, the now traditional
foods of July Fourth are incredibly simple -- leaving eaters free
to focus on refreshing their recollections of their rights. Thomas
Jefferson would be proud.


*Traditionally, in New England, creamed salmon and peas with
new potatoes.  And watermelon, of course...Linda Bee



From the Linda Bee Country Collection of Resources
From the Linda Bee Holiday Collection of Resources
From the Linda Bee Food Collection of Resources
From the Linda Bee History Collection of Resourdes
From the Linda Bee Article Collection of Resources
From the Linda Bee Reference Collection of Resources



Linda Bee
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