PHYSICAL ACTIVITY : CHILDREN : TAX SAVINGS : COST REDUCTION : STATISTICS : DATA : SIMULATION : MODELS: More Physical Activity among Children will Save America Billions

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
1 message Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY : CHILDREN : TAX SAVINGS : COST REDUCTION : STATISTICS : DATA : SIMULATION : MODELS: More Physical Activity among Children will Save America Billions

David P. Dillard
Administrator




.

.


PHYSICAL ACTIVITY :

CHILDREN :

TAX SAVINGS :

COST REDUCTION :

STATISTICS :

DATA :

SIMULATION :

MODELS:

More Physical Activity among  Children will Save America Billions

.

.


More Physical Activity among  Children will Save America Billions

By Bruce Y. Lee and Marie Ferguson

May 2, 2017

STAT News

https://www.statnews.com/2017/05/02/children-physical-activity-obesity/


.

.


Based on results from a model we just published in the journal Health
Affairs, too little physical activity among children now and later will
translate into heart attacks, diabetes, cancer, and billions of dollars of
avoidable health care costs.

.

Fewer than one-third of children are active to a healthy level. The Sports
and Fitness Industry Association defines that as 25 minutes of
high-calorie-burning physical activity three times a week. Twenty-five
minutes isnt that long. Its less than an episode of Sesame Street and
slightly longer than the time it takes to eat a meal or snack. And the
percentage of children who meet this goal has been falling.

.

Physical activity is a key contributor to current and future health. It
helps kids maintain a healthy weight and also improves bone and muscle
strength, circulation, mental health, and many other aspects of health.
Being overweight or obese can lead to a variety of chronic diseases, such
as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Its not the only thing
that helps kids stay at a healthy weight  food and drink, sleep, stress,
and medications can also affect weight  but it plays a big role.

.

Our team at the Global Obesity Prevention Center at Johns Hopkins
University, in collaboration with colleagues at the Pittsburgh
Supercomputing Center at Carnegie Mellon University, wanted to know what
would happen if our countrys children exercised more. We developed a
computer simulation called Virtual Population for Obesity Prevention, or
VPOP. It serves as a virtual laboratory that lets us test the effects of
different changes on all Americans or on segments of the population.

.

In our model, every virtual child has a height and weight, age, household
location, and other characteristics that match the distribution of real
children in the United States. Each one also has a starting body mass
index, which is a measure of weight for height. Every simulated day, each
virtual child consumes specified amounts of food and beverages based on
what American children are really eating these days  which isnt always
good. For every simulated day, each virtual child also has a probability
of engaging in different amounts of physical activity, again based on
data. The model converts daily calories in and out and amount of physical
activity to changes in weight.


.

.

The complete article may be read at the URL above.

.

.



Modeling The Economic And Health Impact Of Increasing Childrens Physical
Activity In The United States

     Bruce Y. Lee1,*, Atif Adam2, Eli Zenkov3, Daniel Hertenstein4, Marie
C. Ferguson5, Peggy I. Wang6, Michelle S. Wong7, Patrick Wedlock8, Sindiso
Nyathi9, Joel Gittelsohn10, Saeideh Falah-Fini11, Sarah M. Bartsch12,
Lawrence J. Cheskin13 and Shawn T. Brown14

Health Affairs

+
Author Affiliations

     1Bruce Y. Lee ([hidden email]) is executive director of the Global
Obesity Prevention Center and an associate professor in the Department of
International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Health, in Baltimore, Maryland.


     2Atif Adam is a senior analyst at the Global Obesity Prevention
Center.


     3Eli Zenkov is a programmer analyst at the Global Obesity Prevention
Center and a public health applications developer at the Pittsburgh
Supercomputing Center at Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania.


     4Daniel Hertenstein is a senior programmer analyst at the Global
Obesity Prevention Center.


     5Marie C. Ferguson is a senior analyst at the Global Obesity
Prevention Center and a research associate in the Department of
International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.


     6Peggy I. Wang is a senior research program coordinator at the Global
Obesity Prevention Center.


     7Michelle S. Wong is a senior analyst at the Global Obesity Prevention
Center.


     8Patrick Wedlock is a systems modeler at the Global Obesity Prevention
Center.


     9Sindiso Nyathi is a systems modeler at the Global Obesity Prevention
Center.


     10Joel Gittelsohn is director of community interventions at the Global
Obesity Prevention Center and a professor in the Department of
International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.


     11Saeideh Falah-Fini is an assistant professor in the Department of
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at the California State
Polytechnic University, in Pomona, and a collaborator at the Global
Obesity Prevention Center.


     12Sarah M. Bartsch is a senior analyst at the Global Obesity
Prevention Center and a research associate in the Department of
International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.


     13Lawrence J. Cheskin is director of clinical research at the Global
Obesity Prevention Center and associate professor in the Department of
Health, Behavior, and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public
Health.


     14Shawn T. Brown is director of computational research at the Global
Obesity Prevention Center and director of public health applications at
the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center at Carnegie Mellon.

     ?*Corresponding author

Abstract

Increasing physical activity among children is a potentially important
public health intervention. Quantifying the economic and health effects of
the intervention would help decision makers understand its impact and
priority. Using a computational simulation model that we developed to
represent all US children ages 811 years, we estimated that maintaining
the current physical activity levels (only 31.9 percent of children get
twenty-five minutes of high-calorie-burning physical activity three times
a week) would result each year in a net present value of $1.1 trillion in
direct medical costs and $1.7 trillion in lost productivity over the
course of their lifetimes. If 50 percent of children would exercise, the
number of obese and overweight youth would decrease by 4.18 percent,
averting $8.1 billion in direct medical costs and $13.8 billion in lost
productivity. Increasing the proportion of children who exercised to 75
percent would avert $16.6 billion and $23.6 billion, respectively.

http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/36/5/902.abstract























Sincerely,
David Dillard
Temple University
(215) 204 - 4584
[hidden email]
http://workface.com/e/daviddillard

Net-Gold
https://groups.io/g/Net-Gold
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold
http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/net-gold.html
https://groups.io/org/groupsio/Net-Gold/archives
http://net-gold.3172864.n2.nabble.com/

Temple University and Google Sites Research Guides
AND Discussion Group Directory
http://tinyurl.com/ngda2hk

OR

https://sites.google.com/site/researchguidesonsites/

FAKE NEWS
https://sites.google.com/site/fakenewsresearchguide/

RESEARCH PAPER WRITING
https://sites.google.com/site/howtowriteasuperresearchpaper/

EMPLOYMENT
https://sites.google.com/site/employmentsources/

INTERNSHIPS
http://tinyurl.com/2f9x2wp

TOURISM RESEARCH GUIDE
http://tinyurl.com/ycko9hqj


DISABILITIES AND EMPLOYMENT
https://sites.google.com/site/disabilitiesemploymentresearch/


Educator-Gold
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Educator-Gold/

K12ADMINLIFE
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/K12AdminLIFE/


Social Work and Social Issues Discussion Group
https://groups.io/g/social-work

Tourism Discussion Group
https://groups.io/g/Tourism

Digital Scholarship Discussion Group
https://groups.io/g/DigitalScholarship/threads
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/digital-scholarship/info
https://digitalscholarshipandscholarlypublication.wordpress.com/


Copyright Research Guide
Copyright, Intellectual Property and Plagiarism Sources
https://sites.google.com/site/copyrightlawsites/

Fair Use
http://guides.temple.edu/fair-use

Blog
https://educatorgold.wordpress.com/

Articles by David Dillard
https://sites.google.com/site/daviddillardsarticles/

Information Literacy (Russell Conwell Guide)
http://tinyurl.com/78a4shn

Twitter: davidpdillard

Temple University Site Map
https://sites.google.com/site/templeunivsitemap/home

Bushell, R. & Sheldon, P. (eds),
Wellness and Tourism: Mind, Body, Spirit,
Place, New York: Cognizant Communication Books.
Wellness Tourism: Bibliographic and Webliographic Essay
David P. Dillard
http://tinyurl.com/o4pn4o9

Rail Transportation
https://groups.io/org/groupsio/RailTransportation

INDOOR GARDENING
Improve Your Chances for Indoor Gardening Success
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/IndoorGardeningUrban/

SPORT-MED
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/sport-med.html
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sports-med/
http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/sport-med.html

HEALTH DIET FITNESS RECREATION SPORTS TOURISM
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/healthrecsport/info
http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/health-recreation-sports-tourism.html